Sokoine University of Agriculture

Cassava value chain: willingness to pay for improved cassava planting material in coastal and Lake Victoria areas of Tanzania

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dc.contributor.author Maggidi, Issa, Majid
dc.date.accessioned 2021-05-24T12:39:11Z
dc.date.available 2021-05-24T12:39:11Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.identifier.uri http://www.suaire.sua.ac.tz/handle/123456789/3555
dc.description Masters Dissertation en_US
dc.description.abstract Lack of clean planting materials and use of Cassava Mosaic Disease (CMD) and Cassava Brown Streak Disease (CBSD) infected planting materials has been the major constraints to cassava production thus communities need to be empowered to have a self-sustaining clean seed production system. Therefore, agricultural policies of the countries in Sub- Saharan Africa should therefore emphasize seed system strategies which would result in good quality seed of the right varieties being available. There are many factors that hinder cassava production among them is the unavailability of clean quality improved planting material. To overcome the challenge of unavailability of clean quality improved planting materials, it is envisaged that its production in large quantity and dissemination in affordable manner is imminent. The production of such planting materials could be done on commercial basis. Therefore, objective of this study was to assess i) the cassava demand for industrial consumption; ii) the supply base of cassava planting materials; iii) the cost of planting materials incurred by smallholding farmers in the study areas and iv) to determine willingness of smallholding farmers to pay for clean quality improved planting material (improved cassava seeds) when produced and made available to them on commercial basis. The study found that 0 percent of the respondents obtain cassava planting materials from formal seed system, 89 percent do use seed-system approved and released planting materials and 99 percent obtain planting materials from their own source. Also, it was not easy to directly determine the cost of planting materials per hectare, though based on the survey conducted to determine willingness to pay for clean quality improved cassava planting materials it was estimated that smallholding farmers in the study areas would pay TZS 62 500 per hectare to obtain clean quality improved cassava planting materials. It was also found that factors influencing the willingness to pay were age, household monthly income, agronomic cost and residential location. The study also revealed wide range of cassava varieties which are grown in the surveyed areas whereby some of them take long time to mature. The research implications of this study are that the demand for improved cassava seeds creates opportunity for further research into the area whilst the practical implications are that entrepreneurial opportunity is available for investment into commercial production. Socially the results of this study increase the knowledge that smallholding farmers are now willing to pay for improved cassava seeds. It was thus concluded that, although smallholding farmers showed willingness to pay for clean quality improved cassava planting materials when disseminated on commercial setting, the price they are willing to pay is much less compared to what is currently charged by commercial cassava planting materials producers under a pilot project are charging. Also, factors influencing willingness to pay were age, household monthly income, area under cassava cultivation, agronomic cost, CBSD disease attack, revenue from selling cassava, cassava selling price, industrial demand awareness, getting extension services, need for training and farming group membership. Smallholding farmers at Muheza district were more willing to pay compared to Kwimba and lastly Sengerema respectively. It was recommended that community based or commercial planting materials farms be established to ensure smallholding farmers obtain clean quality improved planting materials affordably and timely. It was recommended that a proper governance of the cassava value chain be put in place with measures such as establishing a cassava governing board and policy framework such as a Cassava Master Plan. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Sokoine University of Agriculture en_US
dc.subject Value chain en_US
dc.subject Mosaic Disease en_US
dc.subject Cassava planting en_US
dc.subject Lake Victoria en_US
dc.subject Tanzania en_US
dc.title Cassava value chain: willingness to pay for improved cassava planting material in coastal and Lake Victoria areas of Tanzania en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US


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