Sokoine University of Agriculture

Performance characteristics and costs of serological tests for brucellosis in a pastoralist community of northern Tanzania

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dc.contributor.author Lukambagire, AS
dc.contributor.author Mendes, AJ
dc.contributor.author Bodenham, RF
dc.contributor.author McGiven, JA
dc.contributor.author Mkenda, NA
dc.contributor.author Mathew, C
dc.contributor.author Rubach, MP
dc.contributor.author Sakasaka, P
dc.contributor.author Shayo, DD
dc.contributor.author Maro, VP
dc.contributor.author Shirima, GM
dc.contributor.author Thomas, KM
dc.contributor.author Kassanga, CJ
dc.contributor.author Kazwala, RR
dc.contributor.author Halliday, JEB
dc.contributor.author Mmbaga, BT
dc.date.accessioned 2021-05-11T11:54:26Z
dc.date.available 2021-05-11T11:54:26Z
dc.date.issued 2021
dc.identifier.other | https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-82906-w
dc.identifier.uri http://www.suaire.sua.ac.tz/handle/123456789/3506
dc.description.abstract The control of brucellosis across sub-Saharan Africa is hampered by the lack of standardized testing and the use of tests with poor performance. This study evaluated the performance and costs of serological assays for human brucellosis in a pastoralist community in northern Tanzania. Serum collected from 218 febrile hospital patients was used to evaluate the performance of seven index tests, selected based on international recommendation or current use. We evaluated the Rose Bengal test (RBT) using two protocols, four commercial agglutination tests and a competitive enzymelinked immunosorbent assay (cELISA). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, Youden’s index, diagnostic accuracy, and per-sample cost of each index test were estimated. The diagnostic accuracy estimates ranged from 95.9 to 97.7% for the RBT, 55.0 to 72.0% for the commercial plate tests, and 89.4% for the cELISA. The per-sample cost range was $0.69–$0.79 for the RBT, $1.03–$1.14 for the commercial plate tests, and $2.51 for the cELISA. The widely used commercial plate tests performed poorly and cost more than the RBT. These findings provide evidence for the public health value of discontinuing the use of commercial agglutination tests for human brucellosis in Tanzania. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship DELTAS Africa Initiative Afrique One-ASPIRE scholarship scheme (Afrique One-ASPIRE/DEL-15-008, http://afriq ueone aspir e.org). Â.J.M is supported by The University of Glasgow’s Lord Kelvin/Adam Smith (LKAS) PhD scholarship. R.F.B received scholarship support from the UK Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), Department for International Development (DFID), the Economic & Social Research Council, the Medical Research Council, the Natural Environment Research Council and the Defence Science & Technology Laboratory, under the Zoonoses and Emerging Livestock Systems – Associated Studentship (ZELS-AS) programme (grant number BB/N503563/1). This study was also supported by the Zoonoses and Emerging Livestock Systems program grant numbers BB/L018845 and BB/ L017679 http://www.bbsrc .ac.uk/). en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Nature scientific Report en_US
dc.subject serological tests en_US
dc.subject brucellosis control en_US
dc.subject pastoralist community en_US
dc.subject public health en_US
dc.subject Tanzania en_US
dc.title Performance characteristics and costs of serological tests for brucellosis in a pastoralist community of northern Tanzania en_US
dc.type Article en_US
dc.url https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-021-82906-w en_US


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